Well Worn. Worn Well

The pictures and words are free. It's what they inspire you to do that's gonna end up costing you.

Anonymous asked: Do point size are your BD collars?

Here are the dimensions of my button-down collars:

Collar point length: 9cm
Collar height (at center): 4.5cm
Neckband height (at center): 4.25cm
Tie space: 1.5cm

I also get a lightly lined collar with a stiff, fused neckband, as I find it helps the collar to stand tall when worn with a sport coat.

Anonymous asked: Where would you get suits made if cost was not a factor?

When it comes to bespoke it’s not the price of the suit that matters, but rather the cost of the process.

As it stands now, there is no soup-to-nuts bespoke tailor in Atlanta that does a job worthy of their price. There are some custom shops here and there, retail tailors that do a bit of side work, and then numerous MTM operations, but there is no “real tailor” that can make a garment on-par with what you could readily find in other large cities.

Adding insult to injury, none of the reputable traveling tailors visit Atlanta. The closest destination would be Steed’s bi-annual trips to Nashville.

So this means that even if I wanted to spend top-dollar on a suit, I’d still need to spend way more (in terms of traveling, lodging, opportunity costs, etc.) to actually get that suit. And do remember that all those inconveniences are multiplied, as a true bespoke garment requires multiple fittings.

While I’d like to romanticize the idea of day trips to NYC or long weekends in London or Southern Italy, I’m incredibly realistic about how tiresome all that would get (regardless of lifestyle). And then when you think about how you’re going through all that hassle to spend thousands of dollars, it really adds to the absurdity.

In an ideal world I’d live in a city with readily-available tailoring options. So, if cost was no factor, I’d likely move to fulfill my tailoring fantasies. Either that or I would bribe Chris Despos to come see me once a month.

"Lauren received a last-minute invitation from [Cary] Grant to go to the racetrack. ‘I told him I had on jeans and a blazer and he said, ‘You can’t wear that.’’ After a quick trip to the store for some proper flannels, the two took off to the track—in Grant’s Buick."
via

"Lauren received a last-minute invitation from [Cary] Grant to go to the racetrack. ‘I told him I had on jeans and a blazer and he said, ‘You can’t wear that.’’ After a quick trip to the store for some proper flannels, the two took off to the track—in Grant’s Buick."

via

Anonymous asked: What are some spring/ summer must cops?

I’ve recently torn the elbow on five different work shirts (Do you even lift?), so replacing those is at the top of my list. I’ll likely do a broadcloth, a couple end-on-ends and then the rest linen/cotton. And of course, all in my usual boring pale blues, graph checks and pencil stripes. Very exciting stuff.

I also recently purchased a pair of white jeans. This is an admitted gamble, especially given my group of friends and my penchant for staining the shit out of pants, but we’ll see how they fare. You can buy yours at Sid’s.

The last thing I am possibly eying is a new pair of drivers. In the quest to find a pair of nicely designed, wholly disposable driving moccasins, I may have finally found a pair that fit the bill. More on those once the weather truly turns.

Aside from that I don’t have much on my radar. I have amassed a gigantic list of things I’d like to have:  a few pairs of summer pants, new sunglasses, new wallet, new pair of Gucci loafers, a pair of Chelseas, a new pair of jeans, a lightweight sport coat, etc. I keep all these at the back of my mind and maintain a watchful eye for a deal here or there.

I’m at a point right now where I am pretty well outfitted. Especially in the summer months, when I will change into shorts as soon as I get home from work, I find that I don’t have a lot of must-haves. In the winter it’s much harder, as there is a plethora of things that you can layer here and there. However, come summer, give me a pair of beat-up loafers, a 6” inseam, an airy shirt, and clear liquor cocktail and I’m all set.

Hard to believe all that is right around the corner as I type this wearing cashmere and flannel…

biobebop asked: I too am a bit of closet elitist, and I've had almost the same progression of sunglasses, except that I opted for the Shuron Freeway after Luxxotica refused to honor the guarantee on my Persols. The freeways are popular as corrective eyeglasses, but I have yet to see them on someone else as sunglasses. Shurons are also cheaper than Ray Bans and made in America. I would also suggest Anglo American for cheaper, and (in my opinion) better quality frames over Oliver Peoples.

The Luxxotica takeover is very real and it threatens to create a monopoly within the sunglasses world. Yet another company cashing in on the assumed superiority of a product “Made in Italy,” when in reality their brands are made in the same mass-production factory that you’d find in any exploited, developing nation.

It’s worth noting, however, that there are a few Oliver Peoples (Luxxotica) models that aren’t made the same as the rest. The Sheldrakes in particular are made by nackymade, a much smaller, artistically-driven Japanese boutique brand. You’ve no doubt heard of them via the Armoury.

While I agree that the Shurons and the Anglo Optics are better brands (from a purist standpoint), I do think there is still a solid amount of attention to detail and quality that accompanies the nackymade frames. I also just like their overall aesthetic, particularly the ones I linked to in my initial post.

To make matters worse, at the end of the day we’re all ALWAYS overpaying for sunglasses. So really, one way or the other, we’re all willingly taking it with a smile.

Author’s note: Luxxotica, if you’re reading this, feel free to send me a pair of Sheldrakes to change my perception of your brand.

Anonymous asked: What, in your opinion, is the ideal pair of sunglasses for an adult male? Costas are sporty and better suited for the water, Wayfarers have been completely taken over by the neon college crowd. Thoughts? D in RVA

As you may have discerned from this blog, I’ve always been a bit of a closeted elitist when it comes to everyday dressing. By “closeted elitist” I mean that I revel in details, styling and materials without dressing in a manner that makes those details known. Some may call it “stealth wealth,” but I think that sounds way too cute and contrived.

The first place this idea arose was with my sunglasses. In high school I remember everyone wearing Costas or Oakleys or something along those lines. So I went with a pair of first generation Bausch + Lomb Wayfarers. While there were kids wearing similar glasses, they weren’t the same. Again, just a small detail that didn’t rock the boat, but did (often) garner compliments from perceptive peers.

When I got to college I broke my beloved Wayfarers and shifted to a pair of Persol 714s. They were great glasses and garnered even more compliments — worth noting that girls love “fold-y glasses.” 

Post-college I noticed a lot of dudes were jumping on the Persol train. I’ve never been one to abandon my tastes just because they turn mainstream, but when my 714s broke last summer I saw it as an opportunity to change it up a bit. I now wear Shuron Sidewinders, which, even though they appear very similar to Wayfarers, are not quite the same (sensing a pattern?)

I plan to wear the Shurons for many years and they have been great. However, if I had to buy a new pair tomorrow, I would immediately go for a pair of Oliver Peoples Sheldrakes.

So, as far as personal experience and opinion goes, that’s where my head is at. In a more general sense, however, I would find a shape or style of sunglasses that fit you great. Pay attention to the details in the design and what you like about how they fit. Then ask a sales person or consult the internet on what general shape they are. From there you can do all sorts of digging.

While I have enjoyed bouncing around between frames and styles, don’t feel like you always need to be on the outside. It’s perfectly fine to wear glasses that are mainstream or less than avant-garde. If they look good on you and you like them, don’t beat yourself up on reinventing the wheel.

Tuesday mornings have become a much-needed dose of comedic relief as of late. I have to assume there is a webmaster somewhere within the bowels of the Mr. Porter Death Star who spends most of his Monday nights thinking, “No fucking way.”
The latest assumed inside joke of the executive Porterheads? $900 Havaianas.
The Brioni polo shirt was absurd. There’s no debating that. No polo shirt is worth over $1,000. End of story. However, at least maybe you could convince some idiot that the materials and labor somewhat justify the cost. You know, like how the fabric is made from Unobtanium and the shirt is hand-knitted by the CEO of Brioni.
However, $900 for shoes that were historically staples of sweat-shop workers and homeless South Americans is arguably the most asinine, over-the-top thing in the world. It’s not enough that you have to be rich to buy them. No, you also must wear them in a spirit that directly mocks the poor people that established the brand. It’s as if you want to step on poor people, but don’t want to dirty your Burch-tanned JR soles in the process.
It’s far from me to say that Mr. Porter shouldn’t sell these. Au contraire, I hope they sell a million pairs. Because people that would buy these shoes don’t deserve to have money. Hopefully this purchase puts them over-the-edge and into bankruptcy. Hopefully this purchase makes them homeless. Hopefully this purchase forces them to get a job in a sweat-shop. That would be so meta.

Tuesday mornings have become a much-needed dose of comedic relief as of late. I have to assume there is a webmaster somewhere within the bowels of the Mr. Porter Death Star who spends most of his Monday nights thinking, “No fucking way.”

The latest assumed inside joke of the executive Porterheads? $900 Havaianas.

The Brioni polo shirt was absurd. There’s no debating that. No polo shirt is worth over $1,000. End of story. However, at least maybe you could convince some idiot that the materials and labor somewhat justify the cost. You know, like how the fabric is made from Unobtanium and the shirt is hand-knitted by the CEO of Brioni.

However, $900 for shoes that were historically staples of sweat-shop workers and homeless South Americans is arguably the most asinine, over-the-top thing in the world. It’s not enough that you have to be rich to buy them. No, you also must wear them in a spirit that directly mocks the poor people that established the brand. It’s as if you want to step on poor people, but don’t want to dirty your Burch-tanned JR soles in the process.

It’s far from me to say that Mr. Porter shouldn’t sell these. Au contraire, I hope they sell a million pairs. Because people that would buy these shoes don’t deserve to have money. Hopefully this purchase puts them over-the-edge and into bankruptcy. Hopefully this purchase makes them homeless. Hopefully this purchase forces them to get a job in a sweat-shop. That would be so meta.